Last edited by Sarn
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Seismic wave attenuation in glacial ice. found in the catalog.

Seismic wave attenuation in glacial ice.

Thomas Edward Clee

Seismic wave attenuation in glacial ice.

by Thomas Edward Clee

  • 277 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ice,
  • Internal friction,
  • Physics Theses

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (M.Sc.), Dept. of Physics, University of Toronto

    ContributionsSavage, James C. (supervisor)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsLE3 T525 MSC 1968 C53
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[57 leaves]
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17539539M

    Glacial ice is a nearly pure to highly impure polycrystalline solid composed of crystals in varying orientations and sizes (typically from sub-mm to many cm). At time scales exceeding seismic (elastic) periods (i.e. longer than many minutes), glacial ice viscously deforms under deviatoric stress as a strain rate-softening material. Seismic Wave Attenuation (Geophysics Reprint Series No 2) by Toksoz, M. N., Johnston, D. H. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at

      Abstract. Stratum quality factors (P-wave and S-wave quality factors, Q p and Q s) have gradually been utilized in the study of physical state of crust and uppermost mantle, tectonic evolution, hydrogeololgy, gas hydrates, petroleum exploration, etc. Different opinions of the seismic attenuation mechanism result in various approaches to estimate the P-wave and S-wave quality by: Seismic wave attenuation in the uppermost glacier ice of Storglacïaren, Sweden by: Tavi, Murray, et al. Published: () A decade ( ) of supraglacial lake volume estimates across Russell Glacier, West Greenland by: Glenn, Jones Published: ()Cited by:

    In reflection seismology, the anelastic attenuation factor, often expressed as seismic quality factor or Q (which is inversely proportional to attenuation factor), quantifies the effects of anelastic attenuation on the seismic wavelet caused by fluid movement and grain boundary friction. As a seismic wave propagates through a medium, the elastic energy associated with the wave is gradually. Aside from numerous publications on all aspects of seismic data analysis, Öz wrote a book entitled Seismic Data Processing published by SEG in The expanded, two-volume second edition entitled Seismic Data Analysis was published, again by SEG, in January, And his third book is entitled Engineering Seismology published by SEG, May,


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Seismic wave attenuation in glacial ice by Thomas Edward Clee Download PDF EPUB FB2

We estimated seismic-wave attenuation using the spectral-ratio method on the energy travelling in the uppermost ice with an average temperature of approximately −1°C. at grain boundaries dominate seismic attenuation when they are present; the temperature above which melt occurs for glacial ice is approximately T = 30 C [e.g., Dash et al.,] (Figure 1), but can be lowered by sufficiently high concentrations of impurities [Kuroiwa and Yamaji, ; Kuroiwa, ; Spetzler and Anderson, ;Cited by:   [12] For polycrystalline ice, which includes all naturally occurring glacier ice, quasi‐liquid films generated by melting at grain boundaries dominate seismic attenuation when they are present; the temperature above which melt occurs for glacial ice is approximately T = −30°C [e.g., Dash et al.,], but can be lowered by sufficiently high concentrations of impurities [Kuroiwa and Yamaji, ; Cited by: Seismic wave attenuation in the uppermost glacier ice of Storglacïaren, Sweden by: Kulessa, Bernd Published: () Vertical distribution of water within the polythermal Storglaciären, Sweden by: Tavi, Murray Published: ().

Sustained seismic tremors and icequakes detected in the ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet - Volume 60 Issue - Claudia Röösli, Fabian Walter, Stephan Husen, Lauren C.

Andrews, Martin P. Lüthi, Ginny A. Catania, Edi Kissling. The present work is a contribution to seismic investigation on glacier ice. During the – and – field seasons, reflection and refraction seismic surveys were undertaken (Benjumea, ).

These data constrain the ice thickness and provide an image of the ice-bed contact in the Johnsons Glacier (Livingston Island, Antarctica).Cited by:   Detecting and characterising an englacial conduit network within a temperate Swiss glacier using active seismic, ground penetrating radar and borehole analysis - Volume 60 Issue 79 - Gregory Church, Andreas Bauder, Melchior Grab, Lasse Rabenstein, Satyan Singh, Hansruedi Maurer.

analysis. The attenuation of wave is defined by the inverse of quality factor (−1) while quality factor () is the wave transmission quality of the medium.

Knopoff13 defined the attenuation of wave in terms of energy as 1 2 Q E SE ' where Δ is the loss of energy per cycle and is the total energy of the wave. The attenuation of seismic wavesFile Size: KB. Seismic wave speeds in ice and in the subglacial sediments and rocks depend on the bulk moduli, the strength of anisotropy and on the densities of the materials.

Shear wave velocities are extremely sensitive to the shear modulus and to fluid content, which is related to porosity. Seismic reflection profiling can be used to map gross. Seismic attenuation α, or internal friction Q-1, in glacial ice is highly sensitive to temperature, particularly near the melting point.

Title: Seismic wave attenuation in the uppermost glacier ice of Storglacïaren, Sweden: Authors: Gusmeroli, Alessio; Clark, Roger A.; Murray, Tavi; Booth, Adam D.

Classics of Elastic Wave Theory (SEG Geophysics Reprint Series No. 24) brings together for the first time 16 key papers on elastic wave theory, starting with Hooke's 'Potentiva Restitutiva, or Spring,' and grouped into five historical periods through the midth : Paperback.

Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes P. Price Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CAUSA Two classes of natural solid media – glacial ice and salt domes – are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy ≥ eV.

Introduction • Seismic attenuation: attribute of waves propagating in the earth. Quality factor Q: ratio of stored energy to dissipated energy • Rock properties: rock File Size: 1MB. a real seismic dataset we collected from Taku Glacier, a valley glacier in Southeast Alaska.

FIELD SETTING AND DATA Taku glacier ice-sediment dynamics Taku Glacier is a tidewater glacier in Southeast Alaska, cur-rently in its advancing phase and protected from subaqueous melt and calving by a sediment shoal at its terminus (Fig. The team expands on their previous studies of ice behavior by exploring seismic-wave attenuation as a function of strain in polycrystalline ice.

The study is designed to explore upper mantle conditions in terms of microstructure: dislocation density, sub-grain size and crystal preferred orientation. Xiangchun Wang, Lunhang Liang and Zhongliang Wu, Research on Seismic Wave Attenuation in Gas Hydrates Layer Using Vertical Cable Seismic Data, Pure and Applied Geophysics, /s,10, (), ().Cited by: Seismic attenuation in porous rocks with random patchy saturation.

Toms Cited by: In the case of ice vibrations, a spectral analysis was made. The present book is a synthesis of the results obtained. There are reports that the number of seismic events in glaciers has recently grown, which may be related to changing geometry of glaciers due to changing thermal conditions.

Attenuation of seismic waves. Seismic waves decay as they radiate away from their sources, partly for geometric reasons because their energy is distributed on an expanding wave front, and partly because their energy is absorbed by the material they travel through. Seismic constraints on magma chambers at Hekla and Torfajökull volcanoes.

In Situ Acoustic Attenuation Measurements in Glacial Ice JAMES A. WESTPHAL Division o/Geological SciencesL Cali/ornia Institute o/Technology, Pasadena A,bstract. The attenuation coefi%ient of ice in a temperate valley glacier was measured by spectral analysis of the pressure pulse, directly transmitted through the ice from a small ex.The energy-flux model of seismic coda, developed by Frankel and Wennerberg (), is used to derive path-averaged estimates of scattering (⁠ ⁠) and intrinsic attenuation (⁠ ⁠) for northeastern North model predicts the amplitude of the coda wave versus time as a function of frequency, ⁠, and ⁠.A nonlinear inversion scheme is developed that allows for the estimation of Cited by: 2.wave impedance Fast attenuation due to conductivity of rocks Seismic refraction Seismic travel time - Seismic velocity Seismic wave attenuation Seismic reflection Seismic travel time - Contrasts in acoustic wave impedance Seismic wave attenuation Earth’s magnetic field acts like a natural source that illuminates below the surface of the Size: KB.